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  • Emergency & Urgent Care

    Is this an Emergency?

    In an emergency, seconds count. If you are alarmed by unusually severe symptoms, seek immediate care. Please call 911 if you feel your condition is life threatening. If a poison is involved, please call Grand Rapids Poison Control Center at (800) 222-1222.

    When to go to the Emergency Room When to go to Urgent Care
  • Hospital ER
    NOW OPEN

    Emergency Room Hours:
    24 hours a day, 7 days a week

    • Directions to the ER

      5900 BYRON CENTER AVE SW

      WYOMING, MI

      (616) 252-7200

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  • Urgent Care

    Urgent Care Hours:
    Open 9 am - 9 pm, 7 days a week

    • Directions to Urgent Care

      4055 CASCADE RD SE

      GRAND RAPIDS, MI

      (616) 252-4010

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  • Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography (ERCP)

    An endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatogram (ERCP) is a test that combines the use of a flexible, lighted scope with X-ray pictures to examine the tubes that drain the liver, gallbladder, and pancreas.

    The endoscope is inserted through the mouth and gently moved down the throat into the esophagus, stomach, and beginning of the small intestine until it reaches the point where the ducts from the pancreas and gallbladder drain into the small intestine.

    ERCP can treat certain problems found during the test. If an abnormal growth is seen, an instrument can be inserted through the endoscope to obtain a sample of the tissue for further testing. If a gallstone is present in the common bile duct, the doctor can sometimes remove the stone with instruments inserted through the endoscope. A narrowed bile duct can be opened by inserting a small wire-mesh or plastic tube, called a stent, through the endoscope and into the duct.

    ERCP is done to:

    • Check persistent abdominal pain or jaundice.
    • Find gallstones or diseases of the liver, bile ducts, or pancreas.
    • Remove gallstones from the common bile duct if they are causing a problem such as blockage, inflammation or infection of the common bile duct, or pancreatitis.
    • Open a narrowed bile duct or insert a drain.
    • Get a tissue sample for further testing.
    • Measure the pressure inside the bile ducts (manometry).
joseph.weller@metrogr.org